The Facts About Air Compressors {awesome|amazing|Great|Special}

An air compressor is a device built to compress or consolidate air inside a tank. Air compressors work fairly similarly to the way our lungs work when we hold our breath and, perhaps, blow up a balloon. The air is pulled and compressed in the tank (like air in our lungs) increasing the air’s pressure and decreasing its volume. When using the tool, the compressed air releases through a hose in a steady, powerful stream – like from our lungs and out of our pursed lips in a bursting stream of air. In compressors, the air pressure inside the tank will continue to increase until it reaches a preset pressure limit. The tool’s pressure limit varies from high to low with the type and size of your compressor. Air compressors also feature a regulator that is set to compliment the specific tool’s and application’s required pressure.

Compresses are used for a variety of purposes from powering pneumatic or power tools (like nailers, and staplers) blowing dust and debris off/out of those power tools, or as an inflation device for tires, flotation devices, and etc. Available in a variety of sizes and capacities, air compressors are versatile and surprisingly long-lasting; a good model could certainly last a lifetime if properly cared for. Using compressor powered pneumatic tools offers a number of benefits; pneumatically powered tools tend to be more brawny than those powered with strictly electricity, they offer greater torque and higher RPM for quick work and rapid firing. Pneumatic tools also offer an environmentally friendly alternative to toxic battery waste.

There are two types of air compressor, gas or electric, but each of these types is available with a few variations. Some compressors are small and portable, others are very large and stationary – the amount of power your compressor has generally coincides with its size. These large, stationary compressors are best suited for industrial applications and can be used by more that one person simultaneously. Compressors also vary from single stage to two stages; a two stage motor has the ability to change speeds during more constant and rigorous actions – essentially a two stage motor works harder when you need it to. Lastly, some compressors require oil lubrication while others run entirely without oil. Oil lubricated compressors tend to run more quietly; they do, however, require oil changes, operation on a flat, level surface, and may release an oil mist into the air which is highly ill-suited for applications like painting. Although many craftsmen prefer to use oil-lubed compressors because they tend to last longer and run quieter (as with any other type) they may not be practical for some applications.

Gas powered compressors are optimal on jobsites or construction zones that have not yet been outfitted with electrical power. These compressors provide the power and speed of pneumatic tools without the need for power cords or electricity. Gas compressors must, however, be used in open and well ventilated areas. Electric compressors are generally the best choice for home and shop use. They tend to run more quietly and don’t stink up the joint, if you will, with a gas motor.

Keeping your air compressor well maintained will truly determine how long your compressor will keep on kicking. There are a few simple steps to ensuring your compressor remains in optimal condition, and you certainly won’t regret the time you spend caring for your tool. The compression that occurs in the air tanks of your compressor causes moisture to accumulate inside those tanks. That moisture, in turn, runs the risk of rusting out the tanks, and potentially destroying a paint mixture (if used with a paint sprayer). On the bottom of the compressor there is a moisture release valve; it is crucial to release this valve with every use, this should prevent rust or other water damage. An in-line filter can also be be purchased for any compressor to eliminate water mist in your air lines.

Its important to inspect your compressors; periodically check and tighten any fasteners, make sure your air filters are running clean and replace them when necessary, check your hoses often for breaks, cracks, or leaks and be prepared to replace them when needed as well. Its also important to be certain that the compressors safety valve is functional. The safety valve (either automatically or manually) releases air should the compressor become over-pressurized; a vital feature, so be sure its operational or have it repaired. If you have an oil-lubed compressor, check the oil levels before each use to make sure the tool is properly lubricated. Change the oil as the manufacturer recommends. As far as cleanliness is concerned, its always beneficial to keep all your tools clean as a whistle and especially important to keep the compressor’s intake vents clean and clear. If you have a gas compressor you may also consider periodically cleaning the fuel tank for good measure.

A good compressor is a superior tool, and can truly take the edge off a jobsite or home-repair project. With unmatched speed and power a compressor and their partnering pneumatic tools will change the way you build. Love your compressor, purchase the model that best suits you, keep it well-maintained, and your compressor will work as hard as you do.



Source by Mallory Kramer

Chest Woodworking Plans – A Guide to Choosing Your Woodworking Project Plans {awesome|amazing|Great|Special}

You don’t have to be a kid to appreciate wooden chests. Wooden chests are fun pieces of furniture, and building them is even more enjoyable. In fact, chest woodworking projects are an excellent way to start your woodworking hobby. They are fairly easy to construct and they do not require a lot of materials. Your creativity an also go full swing as you are not restricted to particular schemes or styles when it comes to chest woodworking You can try your hand on creating a wacky pirate treasure box or an ‘antique’ cherry chest.

However, chest woodworking projects still vary in complexity so make sure you choose one appropriate to your skill level. Good woodworking plans usually state the level of difficulty and that’s the first thing you should take a look at. Here’s more:

Design Notes

The beauty of a chest woodworking project is that you get to play around with the design. It would be fun to choose ornamental hinges and front clasps. Handles would also be a good addition as it will make it easy to move the chest around when needed. A good woodworking plan should include suggestions on ornamental additions, finishing and general design patterns, if any.

Bill of Materials

Materials for chest woodworking vary greatly. You can make one out of plywood, pine, cedar or cherry. Just make sure there is a detailed cutting list. Another point is that some wooden chests are constructed without nailing the boards or pieces of wood. Some woodworkers prefer wood glue. But there are instances when you cannot do away with screwing the pieces together. Good chest woodworking plans have detailed lists of materials.

The Control Mechanism Feature

Wooden chests have two major parts; the base and the lid. A good woodworking plan would involve instructions on installing a control mechanism, like a simple chain inside the chest to prevent the lid from swinging too far out and causing damage to the hinges.

The Instructions

Dovetail joints, biscuit joints, tongue and grove – these might be things an expert woodworker can accomplish without a sweat. But not everyone could. Good chest woodworking plans do not necessarily have to initiate you to woodworking jargon (you should learn them eventually, if you are a true-blue woodworking enthusiast); instead they should be clear and should provide step by step instructions.

Since these storage units are easy to construct, you won’t find yourself in a lot of frustrating moments that is often the case with more complicated projects like dining tables and outhouses. What better way to boost your woodworking skills than by working on something you can actually finish, and enjoy while doing so.



Source by Jim Goodman

Whittling – Whittling Vs Wood Carving {awesome|amazing|Great|Special}

Whittling is the removal of pare shavings or the cutting of small bits from a piece of wood. It is the most basic form of wood carving but it is not actually the art of wood carving, as it is done today. Wood carving requires a number of tools, even power tools at that. So it could get complicated pretty fast. But this is not how it is when one whittles. All you need to whittle are two things: a piece of wood and a knife.

True whittling has always been very simple. Details in the wood aren’t very refined but rather pretty coarse. When you are holding a whittled object in your hand, you know it. You can plainly see each knife stroke. Using sand paper isn’t an option. This is the exact opposite of wood carving, which typically excels in details. When you’re holding a wood carving of the same object, you usually won’t see even one knife stroke. It’s very interesting. Whittling a little girl could take a week when all you’re using is a knife. Wood carving the same little girl requires more tools but it takes just a fraction of the time. She’ll also have many details that couldn’t be produced with just a knife.

Whittling requires no special tools, no special circumstance or any specific type of working environment. Just you, a piece of wood and your knife are all it takes. You can whittle anywhere inside or outside your home, in a car, at a picnic, in a park-nearly anywhere. This is not so with detailed wood carving.

There are quite a number of special tools that you’ll likely be using when you wood carve. There are detail knives and carving knives, wood rasps and wood files, wood gouges and wood chisels. And these aren’t all of them. (Ever heard of a sanding stick?) There’s a very good chance that you’ll probably have a handful of power tools as part of your wood carving tool kit. Then you’ll also need to concern yourself with how to supply electric power. It isn’t so simple.

You really do need a designated work area when you’re wood carving. You usually aren’t even holding the wood you’re working on. Many times it’d be a vise doing that for you so you’ll need a good work bench or platform. And with all those valuable tools around, you don’t want anyone fiddling with them. Besides the possibility of losing them, many of them are dangerously sharp and no one should touch them but you. And what about that special creation that you’ve been working on for so long? You surely don’t want any spectators scoping it out when you’re not around. Who knows what’ll happen? (Hey, where’d the nose go?)

The act of whittling is considered to be a contemplative, meditative process. It isn’t so much what you’re whittling but the process itself. Wood carving, on the other hand, is more of an end result process. You strive to create what you see in your mind with all the details that come with it. You’ve a product to produce and so you may not care to spare any time.

It comes down to a matter of taste and how you feel. If you have no care to rush, you want to take your time and see what happens, whittling is for you. If you’d like to see just how skilled you can be, how good you are at bringing out details, wood carving may be just what you’re looking for. Hey, try them both. You might surprise yourself.



Source by Len Q.