Why UPVC Is Best For Exterior Doors {awesome|amazing|Great|Special}

Exterior doors are an important aspect of any home improvement project. Front entry doors are the first thing that visitors to your home will see and you will want to make a good impression. One way to be sure of doing that is with UPVC doors. A UPVC door has several advantages over a wooden door. There’s no denying that a beautifully finished wooden door is appealing. The question is, how long will that wooden door retain its appeal? In many cases, you will have to replace or repair the wood within a few years, as wood is susceptible to weathering and rotting. And it doesn’t take long for that lovely glossy exterior to become a peeling eyesore. If you live in a listed building, you may have to choose timber doors and windows for your remodelling project, but anywhere else, UPVC replacement windows and doors can offer long term value.

The good news is that exterior home doors do not have to be white plastic. Although that is the finish most commonly associated with vinyl exterior doors PVCU is now available in wood effect finishes. Most manufacturers can offer your front entry doors, PVCU patio doors, conservatory doors and double glazed windows in light and dark UPVC finishes. They will look like wood, but will have the weathertight properties that are one of the main advantages of UPVC windows and doors.

And that’s only the start. You can add a touch of style to your vinyl patio doors, external doors, and other plastic doors, with glass panels. These come in a wide range of finishes. You can add a touch of colour to external doors or outside doors with stained glass panels. If you prefer a more understated look, you can use plain bevelled glass panels with a subtle design.

Your PVC doors can let in as much or as little light as you wish. You may prefer just a small panel which allows you to see who’s at the door as an alternative to a peephole. Another option is to have several glass panels which let light into a dark hallway area. As an alternative to including these in the front entry doors, consider putting frosted glass panels at either side of the UPVC doors. Even with frosting, there are different effects you can have, depending on the level of opacity required. If privacy is not a consideration when you remodel, external doors can have almost clear glass panes. However, there are different levels of frosting, and some outside doors allow only a little light to pass through while obscuring the vision of any unexpected callers.

If you plan to install plastic doors, then security may also be a concern. The good news is that the locks on UPVC exterior doors are among the most secure available. Not only can you get secure Yale locks, but the standard locking mechanism favours security, with a ‘twist and turn’ locking process that keeps the door tightly shut and weathertight. With security, insulation, weather resistance and a wide range of finishes, you can’t beat UPVC exterior doors.



Source by Adrian Jones

UK’s Flora, Fauna and Wildlife Under Threat As Hedgerows Continue to Decline {awesome|amazing|Great|Special}

The traditional hedgerow is an institution of the British countryside and as well as its practical application, is one of the most important parts of our horticultural heritage and is becoming an important consideration in environmentally aware garden design.

Host to an eclectic variety of British wildlife, such as the Brown Hare, the Song Thrush, the Doormouse and the Stag Beetle and wild flowers such as the Bluebell and Ragged Robin, our hedgerows are also a cost effective and eco-friendly land and garden divider.

However, this ubiquitous staple of the British countryside, is actually a species under threat and between 1940 and 1990, the common hedgerow underwent a dramatic decline; predominantly due to human influence. More worryingly, the cornucopia of British wildlife that used to thrive in these hedgerows is suffering from the decrease in natural habitat. A combination of increased urbanisation, a rise in the intensity of farming and therefore field size, overgrazing by livestock and improper maintenance have all had a detrimental effect on our hedgerows.

Another key human factor is the collective ignorance of the 1997 Hedgerow Regulations that demand the application for a removal notice for any hedgerow exceeding thirty years of age. There are hedgerows in the UK that date back from before the Enclosure Acts period – 1720 – 1840 and it is a dreadful thought that this precious rural heritage is potentially being destroyed.

The other major contributor to the hedgerow’s decline is the dreaded Elm Bark Beetle. This is a carrier species of Dutch Elm disease (named after its initial discovery in the Netherlands and origins in East Asia) which is a fungal disease that destabilises or ‘flags’ the branch structure of the Elm species. Not being a native disease, our UK hedgerows had no resistance to this disease during the initial epidemics of the 1970’s and 80’s and huge numbers of Elm trees and Elm related hedgerows were lost to the disease.

In response to this rapid decline, two organisations in South London, Great Britain, the BCS (Bromley Countryside Service) and BBAP (Bromley Biodiversity Action Plant), are putting a plan in place to recruit and educate the general public in hedgerow conservation. In the meantime, however, the BBAP and UK’s DEFRA (Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) suggest the following:

Continue hedge laying and coppicing of hedgerows where appropriate and traditionally undertaken

Take account of the well-being of hedgerows when planning home expansion, garden design or improvement

Replenish any gaps within hedges to improve their appearance and potential wildlife sustainability



Source by Josh Ellison